Pre-occupied with the wrong things

Why Occupy should lighten up
What is Occupy trying to do? Occupy Wall Street began in September of last year and has grown into a national movement with several hundred groups participating to various degrees in cities all over the country. They have marched down streets, shut down ports, closed banks—and all to what end? Hostility will lead nowhere. Their methods have to change.

Autism speaks—and so should you

City employees push for autism coverage in their healthcare
Employees of the city of Portland are pushing for more healthcare benefits, specifically benefits to cover family members with autism. And with so much funding needed, they’re not the only ones who should. Autism-related costs are a major concern for many people, and support for families and individuals dealing with autism should be a no-brainer.

Yet another unsettling report

Seriously—what’s going on in Multnomah County?
Another report has just been released by the Coalition of Communities of Color and Portland State (their previous reports had addressed the state of Latinos and Native Americans in Multnomah County). This time, the CCC looked at the situation of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the county. Once again, the statistics are hard to swallow. In fact, the preface warns, “This is an early notice to the readers of this report: it is a tough read.” No kidding.

The rallies aren’t working

Why protesting rising tuition costs isn’t getting results
We all know college is costly. The common notion used to be that private schools were the expensive, elite institutions and that public universities were the affordable alternative―for anyone who wasn’t Ivy League material. But with state governments slashing education funding and tuition costs rising yearly, students and their parents are getting stuck with the swelling price tag of a college degree.

The rallies aren’t working

Why protesting rising tuition costs isn’t getting results
We all know college is costly. The common notion used to be that private schools were the expensive, elite institutions and that public universities were the affordable alternative―for anyone who wasn’t Ivy League material. But with state governments slashing education funding and tuition costs rising yearly, students and their parents are getting stuck with the swelling price tag of a college degree.

Autism speaks—and so should you

City employees push for autism coverage in their healthcare
Employees of the city of Portland are pushing for more healthcare benefits, specifically benefits to cover family members with autism. And with so much funding needed, they’re not the only ones who should. Autism-related costs are a major concern for many people, and support for families and individuals dealing with autism should be a no-brainer.

Yet another unsettling report

Seriously—what’s going on in Multnomah County?
Another report has just been released by the Coalition of Communities of Color and Portland State (their previous reports had addressed the state of Latinos and Native Americans in Multnomah County). This time, the CCC looked at the situation of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the county. Once again, the statistics are hard to swallow. In fact, the preface warns, “This is an early notice to the readers of this report: it is a tough read.” No kidding.

Editorial: Read no evil

A free and unrestrained press serves not only to cultivate a better-informed citizenry, but also to report on abuses of power and privilege that might otherwise go unknown and unpunished. It is for precisely this reason that politicians, businesses and other institutions of power employ public relations specialists who can promote the positive and obfuscate the negative.

The wheels on the bus

Increased assaults on TriMet raising concerns for riders
Those who rely on public transit can have a complex relationship with the system. It is necessary to find intrigue in each aspect of the system in order to endure the trying situations to which TriMet contributes. As a passenger, however, your only worry should be whether or not gridlock will permit your line transfer, not whether your’s or other’s safety is at risk.

A Judaic studies major at PSU

An idea whose time has come
Rabbi Joshua Stampfer began teaching Jewish history and religion courses to a handful of students at Portland State in the dynamic era of the 1960s and maintained a significant presence at the university as an adjunct until 2001. Today, at the age of 90, he is on the verge of seeing the culmination of his years of commitment to the study of the Jewish culture, people and language, as PSU plans for a major development—literally.

Solutions, solutions. Will they really work?

The Legislative team comes to a close, leaving Oregon students with something favorable
The solution to offsetting declining state funds for a university has traditionally been to raise college tuition. But now, tuition has risen to the point of obstructing many students from attending college. And it threatens to keep going up unless something is done about it.

News

Arts & Culture

A crowdsourced list of literature for the new alum

With graduation looming around the corner, many Portland State grads will find themselves with extra down time. Not to worry, though! C.J. has you...

Opinion

The divide between art and science

Educational funding in this country has always come with a narrative: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) is in crisis, and that’s what we hear...