They were rock n’ roll… motherfucker!

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    Cark bandmates Josh Gross and Dustin Wasserman are both accomplished musicians, proficient in a number of musical styles, capable of incredibly synergistic improvisations, and known to exchange some of the wittiest stage banter around.

    But discussing the inner workings of Cark is a bit like discussing the anatomy of the penis. Sure, it’s a complex organic structure, but all you really need to know is that it’s there to have fun.

    Cark is not deep. Cark is not profound. But I can’t remember the last time I had more fun at a show than at the release show for Cark’s one and only album, SUPERHELLAMEGAEPIC, at the Towne Lounge in May. They rocked hard, they rocked loud, and they did it with pride. It made me wonder briefly why anyone had ever bothered to make it more complicated than that.

    "When people see us play they say, ‘it looks like you’re having a great time,’ and yeah, we are," said Josh, guitarist/vocalist, and also editor of Portland State’s Rearguard newspaper.

    If the band is there to have a good time, they’re determined to make you have a good time with them, even if they have to fuck with you a little. The Cark experience is heavy in audience participation, from exhortations to scream, to invitations to assist "the standing drummer" (come to the show to find out what that means).

    Alas, the Cark experience is about to come to an end. Drummer Dustin is headed to Singapore, adding some serious geographic obstacles to keeping the band alive. The band is going out in style, however, with a final show at Berbati’s Pan this Saturday. A show Josh promises Cark will play "with all the fury of a caged puma."

    Cark is not just a reminder, but a challenge to pull ourselves out of our asses and have a good time. Don’t miss it.

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